The Magic of Taking Risks

Step away from your comfort zone.

No, it’s not a new idea. But it is one that deserves attention today more than ever. There is real magic to experience when we push ourselves out of the easy, familiar, and nonthreatening routines, relationships, and behaviors that we’re used to. Most of us are aware of this magical potential in our lives, yet we revert to our autopilot mode of behaving. Our rational mind tells us to play it safe and take the path that’s known – a path where the signposts are clearly labeled, and the destination is certain.

Our rational mind encourages us to avoid risks and unknown dangers. Yet, this is the very thing that keeps us stuck. We want to take risks on people and ideas, but then our rational brains decide to hedge our bets so we don’t look foolish, get rejected, or feel exposed.

A Risk Gone RIght  

A new friendship – from a stranger who lives halfway around the world from me – has helped me to realize just how profoundly these small risks can impact us and those around us. Nitul, a Gallup Certified Coach who lives in India, sent me a message via LinkedIn thanking me for writing a book called Unstuck At Last a few years ago. His parting words were, “I thought I would pen this to you before my rational mind takes over and talks me out of it! Thank you for writing Unstuck.” And with this kind and vulnerable note, a friendship was created.

Nitul and I share many commonalities, despite the vast expanse of geography that separates us. We are both coaches; we are both struggling with the feeling of being stuck – physically and mentally – due to the changes in our routines given the COVID-19 outbreak; and we are similarly struck with the irony in our lives at this moment: we are trying to help others while we are also searching for ways to help ourselves.

Most importantly, we have found that our actions have directly impacted each other. Nitul has reminded me to reach out to others who I might not normally attempt to connect with. I organized a 35th high school class reunion via Zoom last week, which I attribute 100% to my new friend’s bravery in reaching out to me. My book has reminded Nitul that he “has the resources to dip into to get [him] stronger and stronger, every day as [he] manifests [his] vision” to become an authentic and congruent version of himself.

What about You?

What may lie on the other side of taking a few small risks? A new friendship could be formed, an old friendship rekindled, or a long-held dream of learning to play an instrument might be realized. Stepping out of our comfort zones is difficult, but the risk is worth it. Even in these days of various COVID-19 restrictions, there are still (always!) many ways to take chances.

Good luck in finding your own brand of magic. I’d love to hear your stories of risks gone right.

For more practical tools for getting unstuck, see “Unstuck at Last: Using Your Strengths to Get What You Want.”

The Challenge of Giving (and Receiving) Meaningful Feedback: It’s Like Walking a Tightrope

Feedback helps us right our path as well as stay on course. Helpful feedback should make us think . . . about ourselves and about others.

Good communication revolves around the ability to give and receive feedback in a productive manner. As a coach, I give feedback regularly to individuals and teams. If my message is too harsh, it will be disregarded because it is wounding. If my message is too soft, it will not provoke growth and change. I struggle to split the difference and find middle ground. It is a tightrope I walk every day.https://youtu.be/TSfGS7rv3co

I ask for anonymous feedback from all participants after every presentation I give. The feedback I receive keeps me growing, occasionally lifts my spirits, and sometimes keeps me humble. No one is perfect but without honest and meaningful feedback, how can we get better?

Below are tips for giving and receiving feedback. While these tips may not contain new information, they are helpful reminders for me, and possibly you.

 

When Giving Feedback:

  1. Make it relevant. The purpose of meaningful feedback is to help someone improve. Make sure your feedback is aligned with the receiver’s purpose, goals, and desired impact. Bottom line: it’s not about you, it’s about them.
  2. Be specific. Vague feedback, for example, “Your proposal lacked clarity” has less impact than specific feedback. Specific feedback, “You need to create a proposal template that lists specific steps for the client as well as a call to action that’s connected to a timeline” is dramatically more helpful and sets a specific benchmark for future performance. Is the feedback related to a trend or is it a one-time issue that needs to be addressed?
  3. Listen. What is the other side of the story? When delivering feedback, it is important to listen to the receiver and hear the pieces of the story that you may not know. If there are obstacles that lead to less than ideal performance, how can you help to eliminate these obstacles?
  4. Be kind. Remember that it takes at least 5 positive comments to outweigh a negative one. Being sensitive to the feelings and human circumstances of others is critical. Did a personal issue contribute to a lack of performance?

 

When Getting Feedback:

  1. Look for a pattern.When receiving constructive criticism ask yourself, “Have I heard this before?” Instead of chalking it up to “it’s just the way I am” (whether that be talking too fast, interrupting others, or seeming preoccupied when others need your help), ask yourself, “How can I minimize this behavior?” Change is hard . . . but not impossible. Take note when you hear multiple comments related to the same issue. Who could help you change this pattern of behavior?
  2. Be open-minded.It is easy to think, “This is their problem.” Resist this temptation. Ask yourself, “What would it be like to be in my critique-er’s shoes? What is their motivation for giving me this feedback? How is this negatively impacting their work, life, or emotional state?
  3. Listen. Of course, right? You must listen to the feedback, even when the feedback is not 100% accurate, warranted, or welcome. Remember how difficult it is to give appropriate feedback and cut your feedback-giver some slack. (This is especially true if your feedback-giver is less seasoned.) Check yourself for defensiveness. It is not becoming (to anyone). Sadly, defensiveness, and its partner in crime – hostility – can surface during moments when feedback initially appears off the mark.
  4. Be kind.Always (always, always) thank your feedback-giver. This is both critically important and difficult to do. Be sure to have a canned response for feedback that is difficult to digest immediately. For example, “I am so glad you’ve shared this with me. Thank you. Obviously, my intent was not to FILL IN THE BLANK (confuse you, be hostile, seem unfriendly). I will certainly give your comments some thought.”

 

Giving and receiving feedback is challenging! Be sure to walk this tightrope carefully. Falling in the direction of anger, indifference, or disregard – whether you are giving or receiving feedback – can have negative repercussions. Do you know someone who is an expert feedback giver or receiver? Send this on to them with your thanks! Positive feedback is always a day brightener.

Interested in learning more about how leaders can use feedback to catapult their teams to greater success? Check out my newest book FRESH Leadership: 5 Skills to Transform You and Your Team.

https://youtu.be/TSfGS7rv3co

Workplace Friendships: Who Needs Them?

Seriously. You NEED a friend at work.

Gallup is the think-tank leader when it comes to understanding businesses and human behavior. Gallup’s research is based on enormous samples sizes and Gallup has a 40+-year track record of tracking engagement at work. Gallup’s research related to having a best friend at work shows interesting and inspiring findings.

Gallup’s research shows that employees with a best friend at work:

  • are 7x more likely to be engaged;
  • are better at engaging customers;
  • produce higher quality work;
  • have higher well-being; and
  • are less likely to get injured on the job.

If you are like me, you may have thought – or still believe – it’s not necessary to have a bestie at work. This kind of thinking is becoming as outdated as a Rolodex or rotary phone. In case you need to fine tune your thinking about how friendships enhance the workplace, look no further than the recent issue (July-August, 2020) of Harvard Business Review (HBR).

Alison Beard, senior editor at HBR, synthesizes three recent books that delve into the power of friendships at work in her article “True Friends at Work: The Case for Making Deeper Connections with Colleagues.”  The authors of the three books reviewed by Beard (Social Chemistry, by Yale professor Marissa King, Together, by former U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, and Friendship by sociologist Lydia Denworth) agree that creating meaningful friendships at work takes effort. Deep friendships will not instantaneously appear just because we show up to work. Like all things worth having, a best friend at work takes time, effort, and attention.

For instance, the time it takes to develop a friend is between 80 to 100 hours together. To claim someone as a “best” friend, it takes much longer – a whooping 200 hours. Like so many things, a good friendship cannot be rushed, so be patient with yourself and your workmates.

Other tips for sparking meaningful friendships at work include:

  • Candor and/or self-disclosure: Authentic friendships grow early roots when you are able to share your perspective with others.
  • Reciprocity: Be sure to help others. Don’t just be a taker. Give back. Did a colleague bring in a fresh banana bread to share? You don’t need to be a baker to reciprocate. Instead, make a stop at your local donut shop or muffin place one morning to show your appreciation.
  • Listen: Everyone needs a good ear. Talking too much at work (or anywhere) can be annoying. Make sure you really listen to your colleagues’ problems.
  • Ask for help: From my personal perspective, this is the toughest one of the bunch. It’s hard to ask for help at work. We want others to ask US for help. Not the other way around. Asking for help shows vulnerability (in a good way). It can also prompt sincere feelings including gratitude, kindness, and empathy.

Whether you are back in your physical workplace or working remotely, having a close friend at work can lead to a happier and more productive environment.

 

Want to more about creating a conducive environment for workplace friendships and a thriving team culture? Check out my book FRESH Leadership: 5 Skills to Transform You and Your Team.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Building Engagement in Today’s World

The Do’s and Don’ts of Building Engagement in Today’s World

Have your work activities changed since March 15? Have these changes improved your work productivity or hindered it? Have they increased your engagement or decreased it? These questions are NEITHER rhetorical nor coy. Some folks are insanely busy and freakishly engaged right now, while others may be struggling. Navigating the working world with COVID-19 is anything but business as usual.

Building engagement at work and choosing to be a company who supports it’s people during the good times and the bad is what sets an exemplary employer apart from the pack. Reaching out to employees during tough times – especially in today’s tough times – and making sure they are engaged at work is what separates the great companies from the good and the not so good places to work. Below are tips for how to find the right training for your team (the DO’S) as well as insights regarding how well-meaning training efforts can backfire (the DON’TS).

Frequently, I discuss this choice as being similar to the choice we make about what to eat. Most of us recognize that some foods are healthier than others. Eating healthy and nutritious foods make us feel good in the long run.”Junk food” can taste good in the short-term but will not give us the energy we need and may damage our health in the long-term. The same goes for providing healthy training programs to your employees. Some training is simply “healthier” than others. A “healthy” training program will help you and your organization in the long run. Below are tips for what to look for when selecting the right training to build engagement in your team.

Do’s

  1. Personalize Your Approach – Your people are one-of-a kind. Your training should reflect the unique personalities and the distinct talents of your team. Are you hoping to build engagement for warehouse personnel, engineers, or sales people? These three groups undoubtedly have very different likes, dislikes, needs, motivators, and more. Be sure to find an engagement training that harnesses the unique strengths of your team.
  2. Use Training Based on Research and Science – The field of organizational behavior (referred to as OB psychology) is still young – less than 100 years old. In the past, there were few training options that had scientific data to back up their effectiveness. Word of mouth became the easiest way to find a decent training program. Those days are long gone. Despite that fact, many professionals still forget to look for training programs that are based on solid research. If a training initiative claims to improve engagement, the next questions should be: how much and how do you know that?
  3. Find a Program that Is Relevant to Today’s Concerns – Make sure your program addresses recent work place changes.  Select a training program that focuses on identifying relevant problems and fixing them . During COVID-19, relevancy is more than a nice to have – it’s a must-have.

Don’ts 

  1. Use a One-Size-Fits-All Approach – Generic training, training that is off-the-shelf, and one-size-fits-all is rarely suitable for your organization’s specific needs. Is it less expensive? Yes. Is it less time consuming to set up and deliver? Yes. Is it less effective? Absolutely yes. A customized approach to training will allow your team members to better understand each other and how they can address the current initiatives. A one-size-fits-all approach can promote disengagement because employees can feel they are not understood.
  2. Use Training Resources Just Because You Have In the Past – The easiest route is rarely the best route when it comes to training and building engagement. If your organization has a history of using a particular product, make sure that this loyalty is based on proven benefits. Effective engagement training should increase engagement as well as productivity, profitability, and customer loyalty. Dusting off outdated training programs can be viewed by employees as an “easy fix” and further increase disengagement.
  3. Ignore New Pain Points and Challenges – Overlooking new difficulties for the team, sweeping them under the rug, and pretending all is fine can confuse and anger team members. If there are real challenges that need to be addressed, find a training program that will help build consensus around solving the issue(s). Ignoring the challenges will only delay your team’s ability to right their path.

If your company is like most, you did a commendable job addressing employees’ basic needs (safety, stability, and security) during the first phase of COVID-19 (see article). Now that your state is in a subsequent phase, what’s your plan to address engagement and meet your employees’ needs?

To learn more about meeting employees where they are today and raising engagement, contact me at Sarah@freshconcepstonline.com or take a quick look at some training packages for you and your team.

 

 

 

 

Connect, Grow, and Transform: Get Your Team Out of the Box

 

Break out of the box

Working from home can be a grind. For many teams who are accustomed to working alongside one another, this unprecedented time of working from home due to COVID-19 has come with a high price tag. The price has been felt in a variety of ways:

  • increased stress,
  • increased loneliness,
  • decreased engagement at work, and
  • decreased overall life satisfaction.

Simply put, we don’t feel like our normal selves because our world has dramatically changed, our work habits have been greatly altered, and the healthy and energizing social interactions that sustain us have morphed into mere shadows of their former selves. As many of us make our first forays into our new world, filled with mask-covered faces and hand sanitizer at every pit-stop, we most likely feel nostalgic for the “good ole days,” when we shook hands or hugged frequently and shared germ-y pens with strangers.

However, there are ways to break yourself and your team out of this stifling box that limits our physical proximity and seems to create emotional distance.

Below are three ideas to help your team connect on a deeper level.

  1. Create a book club: Malcolm Gladwell’s “Outliers: The Story of Success“, Daniel Coyle’s “The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups“, or Shawn Achor’s “The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work” are three prime examples of easy and fun reads that can get your team literally and figuratively on the same page when it comes to instilling new habits that can increase productivity, spark new collaborations, and even decrease stress.
  2. Take the TED Talk Challenge: Ask each of your team members to prepare a TED Talk of their choosing and present their talk to the team. Openness to learning from each other – especially from our work colleagues – is a critical ingredient in the recipe of high performing teams. If your team members are less than enthusiastic about preparing a novel presentation, ask each team member to nominate his or her favorite TED Talk, and dedicate group time to watch and discuss each nominated talk over the course of a few weeks. Whose TED Talk had the biggest impact? How can any of the lessons learned be applied to the team? (A quick hack for this is to check out the most popular TED Talks or Oprah’s favorites.)
  3. Carve out time for a Virtual Team Strengths Training: Do you understand what makes your team tick? What strengths make your team special and unique? How have today’s workplace changes impacted your team’s work mojo? The first step to better understanding your group is to uncover the strengths of each team member. The second step includes sharing (via a virtual team meeting) how team members can support each other, rely on each other’s strengths, and move to the next level of productivity. The Virtual Team Strengths Training Package includes: CliftonStrengths assessment codes for each team member, individual virtual coaching meetings for each team member, a 1.5 hour team meeting to debrief the strengths of the team, and a book for each team member (either “Unstuck at Last: Using Your Strengths to Get What You Want” or “FRESH Leadership: 5 Skills to Transform You and Your Team”).

 

Contact me (sarah@freshconceptsonline.com) to put a plan in place, transform your team, and break out of the box.

 

Trust, It’s Needed Now More than Ever Before

In the blink of an eye, leaders were thrust into a new world . . . a world where they instructed their team members to pack up their office tools and go home . . .  frequently hauling computer monitors, papers, electronic files, and more to do their work thing away from the workplace. And, of course, this takes a certain – I would say, minimal – level of trust. “Start with Trust” (Harvard Business Review, May-June, 2020) has much higher aims for leaders and for the trust they can build among their team. Although “Start with Trust” was not written with a remote working environment in mind, the article has fantastic insights about leading and building trust within a remote workforce.

I highly recommend reading it from start to finish. But in case you want the quickie version, please read on.

Trust, it turns out, is the special ingredient that allows individuals to do more than just survive (onsite or offsite). Business consultants and authors of the “Start with Trust” article, Frances Frei and Anne Morriss, believe that leaders need to create “conditions for [employees] to fully realize their own capacity and power. To do this, [leaders] have to develop stores of trust” (my emphasis).

The 3 Trust Ingredients

The authors claim that there are three areas that drive trust: authenticity (such that people experience the real leader, not a fake), empathy (meaning that people believe the leader cares about them and their success), and logic (in order for people to believe in their leader, they need to believe in their leader’s reasoning.) Let’s consider how each of these areas can be underscored and magnified by leaders during this unprecedented time.

  1. Authenticity: Leaders need to share their own struggles and concerns about COVID-19. Sharing about personal concerns for the health of at-risk family members, friends, and colleagues is one way to be authentic. When leaders put on a mask and pretend that “all is well”, they do a dis-service to their team members who can see beyond the facade. Acknowledging real-life struggles and sharing how they have impacted your personal perspective on social distancing or your organization’s return-to-work plan can connect the “real you” to your team.
  2. Empathy: Many teams have started daily or weekly video-conferencing calls to stay connected with each other. Welcoming your work team into your kitchen, study, or dining area does not require much emotional thought but does spark a new level of intimacy among team members. Some teams have reported to me that they have designated times at the beginning or end of video work calls to have a “Crib Crawl” where various members give home tours. A more common (and less housekeeping-related) way to increase empathy is to check-in emotionally at the beginning of a meeting. How is everyone feeling? What is your emotional health temperature? Recognize that a new host of emotions, including fear, uncertainty, and loss, are a part of our new normal.
  3. Logic: Explain the logic of new business practices. Be as transparent as possible about how decisions are being made, ask for input about those decisions, and be sure to respond with thanks when team members question your thought process. For example, should someone ask, “Why are we wearing masks now but those of us working here since the start of the pandemic haven’t been required to before this week?” Be sure to share gratitude (not annoyance) for the question. A reply that signals openness to such questions might start, “Thanks so much for pointing out this new precautionary step that we are asking everyone to take. You are right. Initially, we did not ask staff to wear masks. Now that we have more information, we have decided that it is in everyone’s best interests to require masks at work.”

Building trust takes time, cognitive effort, and intentional actions. It will not happen overnight. Despite the challenges of working in today’s germ-sensitive world, these same challenges provide an opportunity to lay the foundation, or build the next layer, of trust within your team. What has your team done to rise to this challenge? Please let me know.

To learn more about leadership, trust, and teamwork see my recent book “FRESH Leadership: Five Skills to Transform You and Your Team.”

To read the full Harvard Business Review article mentioned here see “Start with Trust.

The Magic of Taking Risks

Step away from your comfort zone.

No, it’s not a new idea. But it is one that deserves attention today more than ever. There is real magic to experience when we push ourselves out of the easy, familiar, and nonthreatening routines, relationships, and behaviors that we’re used to. Most of us are aware of this magical potential in our lives, yet we revert to our autopilot mode of behaving. Our rational mind tells us to play it safe and take the path that’s known – a path where the signposts are clearly labeled, and the destination is certain.

Our rational mind encourages us to avoid risks and unknown dangers. Yet, this is the very thing that keeps us stuck. We want to take risks on people and ideas, but then our rational brains decide to hedge our bets so we don’t look foolish, get rejected, or feel exposed.

A Risk Gone RIght  

A new friendship – from a stranger who lives halfway around the world from me – has helped me to realize just how profoundly these small risks can impact us and those around us. Nitul, a Gallup Certified Coach who lives in India, sent me a message via LinkedIn thanking me for writing a book called Unstuck At Last a few years ago. His parting words were, “I thought I would pen this to you before my rational mind takes over and talks me out of it! Thank you for writing Unstuck.” And with this kind and vulnerable note, a friendship was created.

Nitul and I share many commonalities, despite the vast expanse of geography that separates us. We are both coaches; we are both struggling with the feeling of being stuck – physically and mentally – due to the changes in our routines given the COVID-19 outbreak; and we are similarly struck with the irony in our lives at this moment: we are trying to help others while we are also searching for ways to help ourselves.

Most importantly, we have found that our actions have directly impacted each other. Nitul has reminded me to reach out to others who I might not normally attempt to connect with. I organized a 35th high school class reunion via Zoom last week, which I attribute 100% to my new friend’s bravery in reaching out to me. My book has reminded Nitul that he “has the resources to dip into to get [him] stronger and stronger, every day as [he] manifests [his] vision” to become an authentic and congruent version of himself.

What about You?

What may lie on the other side of taking a few small risks? A new friendship could be formed, an old friendship rekindled, or a long-held dream of learning to play an instrument might be realized. Stepping out of our comfort zones is difficult, but the risk is worth it. Even in these days of various COVID-19 restrictions, there are still (always!) many ways to take chances.

Good luck in finding your own brand of magic. I’d love to hear your stories of risks gone right.

For more practical tools for getting unstuck, see “Unstuck at Last: Using Your Strengths to Get What You Want.”

You Do You: Being Authentic Pays

Things are rapidly changing for all of us. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, we find ourselves redefining how we work, exercise, shop, and socialize.  We are challenged to rediscover – or maybe learn for the first time – how to be productive and happy with less human interaction and more social distancing. My prediction is that the road will be bumpy. During this time, I encourage authenticity while adhering to the recommended guidelines. I hope, despite the uncertainty in our lives, we can take this time to re-focus and step back, to re-evaluate our routines, and make some needed tweaks. I hope, I am able to be more myself and you are able to be more yourself. As they say, “You do you.”

This go-to phrase means slightly different things for different folks but generally the term is used to encourage someone to be herself, make her own decisions, and behave authentically. When a friend or family member (usually my sister) says to me, “You do you,” I take her to mean this: Do what’s best for yourself, even if it’s different from what I -or others- might do. 

It takes emotional strength and appropriate psychological boundaries to say this to others and mean it! It takes maturity to recognize you can’t always know what’s best for others. Similarly, it takes self-confidence to remind yourself to act according to your own gut, without guilt or misgivings. Many of us were raised to believe that we should consider the needs and expectations of others when choosing a course of action. We may also believe that our friends, family members, and even colleagues will like us more if “we do them” – that is, if we morph our actions and respond in ways they would respond. Remarkably, new research debunks this misconception.

Recent Research:

Harvard Business Review’s February 2020 article (“It Pays to Be Yourself“) highlights research involving 379 working adults who served as participants in a study where they were asked to create a video for a job posting. The participants understood that their videos would be rated by a hiring expert and the participants with the highest scores would receive a financial reward. The participants were randomly assigned to one of three categories, with respective instructions:

Catering Group: This group was told to “Please position your statement for what you believe are the expectations or interests of person watching the video.”

Authenticity Group: This group was told to “Please be yourself. Be genuine with the person who will watch to the video.”

Control Group: This group was told to “Please remember that a person will watch this video to review applicants.”

Scores from these three groups showed that those in the Catering Group were the least likely of all three groups to be hired. In fact, the Authenticity Group had a 26% greater chance at being hired than those who catered to the rater.

Authenticity Wins

There are a few take-a-ways from this research that may impact you today, as COVID-19 restrictions are top of mind, and tomorrow, when we return to a more predictable work life.

  1. When creating new routines to keep yourself safe as well as sane, take time to consider which changes to your life feel like an improvement and which changes feel inauthentic or burdensome. Experts say that this unique time will shape how we live for years to come. What is the silver-lining new practice that could emerge for you?
  2. When selling, forget your inauthentic pitch and, instead, just be yourself. The anxiety produced by faking it during a sales situation is noticeable and can have a negative impact.
  3. When interviewing for a position, remember to be the real you. Instead of spending your preparation time wondering about what your interviewer wants to hear, consider your past successes and the situations in which you feel most confident. How might these successes be replicated?
  4. When interviewing others, start the interview off with a friendly reminder to the candidate to be authentic. This reminder will give the applicant the greatest chance of making a positive impression.

Catering to the needs or interests of others is an outdated strategy. As it turns out, “you do you” is solid advice. When you feel the pull to play to others’ expectations, remember: authenticity always wins.

 

Bring Sunshine, Not Clouds

 

At long last, it’s March. This month promises us days that require sunglasses, the warmth of spring, and the potential of bursting bulbs and buds on our bare trees. After a very typical gray Indianapolis winter, I crave bright and sunny skies, the warmth of the sun on my face, and the comfort of a sun-warmed car. In short, It improves my mood to be warm. But wait, there’s more. Not only does sunshine improve our mood, but it is also a necessity for growth of any kind.

Most of us have had the pleasure of working with or being friends with a person who energizes us, gives us the will to endure a tough day, and helps us recognize how we have helped others or improved a situation. These types of connections and positive interactions can bring a different kind of sunshine and warmth to our lives. The words and attention of these special people nurture our abilities and help us grow in ways that might not be possible without their encouragement. How can you bring your own brand of sunshine to any interaction? Notice what others do well. It’s as simple as that. 

Noticing when others perform a task with capability, kindness, or good-humor are ways to bring sunshine into anyone’s day. The added benefit is that bringing this sunshine into someone else’s life naturally deposits these positive rays into your own life.

For more about how to notice the strengths of others and how to build a team that focuses on strength instead of weakness, see FRESH Leadership: 5 Skills to Transform You and Your Team.

The JoyPowered Workplace Podcast – Tips for Leaders

A huge thank you to JoDee Curtis and Susan White for having me on their podcast. We touched on how I came up with the acronym FRESH (that I explain in greater detail in “FRESH Leadership: 5 Skills to Transform You and Your Team”) and also discuss few of the things I am always game to chat about:

  • how social media fuels our need for feedback,
  • why many managers lead by modeling their past boss, and
  • why I am happiest when I can order dinner for my best friends.

Please tune in!

The JoyPowered Podcast: Helping Your Managers Lead Today